Figure Drawing

We had the model from the portrait class in figure drawing last night.

101717_2

30 minute pose. Vine charcoal on drawing paper, 18×24

101717_1

20 minute pose. Vine and compressed charcoal on newsprint, 18×24.

Figure Drawing

20 minute pose, charcoal on drawing paper 18×24.

9/26/2017
9/26/2017

Wasn’t able to finish this one, the left leg is mid-transition (the calf is still in the original position, shading is just a first pass). The right leg…newbie mistake of waterfall drawing – working down a figure from top to bottom (or side to side in this case). I spent so much time on the torso, I had to rush the legs. I had suggested the cloth while working the torso, and didn’t properly draw in the leg in schematic beforehand, just drew it off the end of the cloth…a few inches too high.

Croquis Cafe Figure Drawing

I’ve been using a great Youtube channel, Croquis Cafe, to practice some figure drawing before class starts next week. First model is Cwen, 2 minute studies and a 20 minute drawing.

Second model was Vex Voir, 20 minutes. All of these are 18×24, charcoal on newsprint.

Bargue Plate 49 WIP

I found a video tutorial for Bargue Plate 49 on the Academy of Realist Art (Toronto)’s site:¬†https://realistartonline.com/courses/drawing-the-bargue/ So I decided to jump ahead to this plate to learn their method for rendering the plates.

I have a scan of the plate that I cut in half, printed on letter-sized paper, and then enlarged on a copier to 11×17. It’s not the best source, I would love to be working off proper full-sized prints. But, it’s close to original size and lends itself to being copied on a standard 18×24 sheet of paper (in this case, I cut the sheet in half and trimmed it).

First we have the completed construct, following the articulation provided on the first half of plate 49. The construct is just a general measured drawing of the basic shapes. Here you can see how I’ve set them up on my drawing board.

Bargue Plate 49 Construct
Bargue Plate 49 Construct

Next I refined the construct into the articulation. Still staying with straight, measured lines, I add more information to the drawing. Once I completed the articulation, I massed in the shadow value shapes with an even tone. By the end of this stage, I’d estimate I’m just over 20 hours in.

Bargue Plate 49 Articulation
Bargue Plate 49 Articulation

Next I will transfer this drawing from bristol sketch paper over to bristol smooth paper, which is lovely for smooth values. The method is the same as when I transfer a drawing to canvas for portraiture: rubbing the back with charcoal and lightly going over the shapes so they mark the paper underneath.

Graphite on bristol sketch paper, 12×16.

Bargue Plate 10.

This one took a while. Not only are these plates challenging to learn, working with graphite on newsprint was a bad idea. Eh, I try things, sometimes they don’t work out. It was good practice due to the struggle for shading, though! Here’s the completed drawing:

Bargue plate 10
Bargue plate 10

And the work in progress shots, if you’re interested in the process.

Bargue plate 10 WIP
Bargue plate 10 WIP
Bargue plate 10 WIP 2
Bargue plate 10 WIP 2
Bargue plate 10 WIP 3
Bargue plate 10 WIP 3

Kirby Iron Man copy

Copy of Kirby’s illustration of Iron Man for the cover of Tales of Suspense #39 (1963). Graphite on bristol sketch paper, 9×12.

Kirby Iron Man copy
Kirby Iron Man copy

Flexor group of the lower arm

I was dreading the lower arm, so many muscles! Here is the page I did for the flexor group of the lower arm. Lots of good practice drawing lower arm and upper hand bones, too.

Flexor group of the lower arm
Flexor group of the lower arm